Wednesday, February 20, 2019

GUYS AND DOLLS @ Rubber City Theatre


                                                  February 15-March 3m 2019
                                         For ticket information call 234-252-0272

David Ritchey

This company of saints and sinners evoke a simpler time and provide a gentle, entertaining evening in the theater. 

Tuesday, February 19, 2019

YANKEE TAVERN @ NONE TOO FRAGILE


(330) 671-4563

Kerry Clawson

For about half of this play, we can laugh off all the wild conspiracy theories that kooky Ray offers ... With this crazy character, [Robert] Branch walks an amazing line between talking like a loon and conveying such intelligence that you just may wonder if his words could carry any truth. Branch — who has a largely balding head with long, wild gray hair on the sides — plays a character who’s passionate about the world in his mind and talks to ghosts upstairs, including Adam’s dead father Vince.

To see a full review of this show, read Kerry Clawson's review here.

David Ritchey
  
The acting is superior. Director Sean Derry did an excellent job with his small cast, confronting the audience in the theater. He helped build the suspense. 

To see a full review of this show, go to 
http://akron.com/akron-ohio-entertainment-news.asp?aID=40004

Saturday, February 16, 2019

TWO BY TENNESSEE @ KARAMU THEATER



Through March 10, 2019
(216) 795-7070

Bob Abelman

Karamu’s ‘Two by Tennessee’ misses its mark.

To see a full review of this show, read Bob Abelman's blog here or go to www.clevelandjewishnews.com/columnists/bob_abelman/

Mark Horning

Do not be fooled by the brevity of these two works. Combined they give you a solid dose of entertainment with the type of message that Tennessee Williams was famous for. This is an intimate evening of theater that is a nice break from the 180 minute extravaganzas we have become used to. It is well worth the time.

To see a full review of this show, read Mark Horning's Review here.

Laura Kennelly
No review yet.
To see a full review of this show, read Laura's posts at Cool Cleveland.

WITNESS FOR THE PROSECUTION @ GREAT LAKES THEATER



Through March 10, 2019
(216) 241-6000

Bob Abelman

Great Lakes Theater’s ‘Witness for the Prosecution’ a guilty pleasure. 

To see a full review of this show, read Bob Abelman's blog here or go to www.clevelandjewishnews.com/columnists/bob_abelman/

Roy Berko

With fine acting, clear directing, impressive technical aspects, and encompassing writing, “Witness for the Prosecution” makes for a wonderful theatrical experience. Go.  See.  Enjoy!

To see a full review of this show, read Roy Berko's blog here.

Mark Horning


The hardest role that an American actor can take is one that involves a British accent. Great Lakes Theater has done the nearly impossible by outfitting their actors with believable speech patterns that truly add to the story. This is a colossal show that if you are among the few who have never witnessed Agatha Christie’s Witness for the Prosecution in any form, you are in for a huge treat of suspense, drama and even comedy. The court is now in session...you be the judge.    

To see a full review of this show, read Mark Horning's Review here.

Laura Kennelly

BOTTOM LINE: An old-fashioned talky courtroom drama, well-executed by a good cast in both major and minor roles. The play itself, however, seems extremely sedate as written and so despite some rather well-done high drama that flares out all too briefly, I want more.BOTTOM LINE: An old-fashioned talky courtroom drama, well-executed by a good cast in both major and minor roles. The play itself, however, seems extremely sedate as written and so despite some rather well-done high drama that flares out all too briefly, I want more.

To see a full review of this show, read Laura Kennelly's post here at Cool Cleveland.

Andrea Simakis
No review yet.
To see a full review of this show, read Andrea Simakis' blog or visit Cleveland.com here.

FIRE ON THE WATER @ CLEVELAND PUBLIC THEATRE


Through March 2, 2019
(216) 631-2727

Bob Abelman
No review yet.
To see a full review of this show, read Bob Abelman's blog here.

Roy Berko
No review yet.
To see a full review of this show, read Roy Berko's blog here.

Kerry Clawson
No review yet.
To see a full review of this show, read Kerry Clawson's review here.

Howard Gollop
No review yet.

Mark Horning

This expanded version (two and a half hours plus intermission) of the original 2015 performance (Part 4 of the Elements Cycle) is a theatrical masterpiece that utilizes every square inch of the performance area while using nearly every form of artistic endeavor known to man. It is as complete a show as you will ever see. Come to be wowed.

To see a full review of this show, read Mark Horning's Review here.

Laura Kennelly
No review yet.
To see a full review of this show, read Laura's posts at Cool Cleveland.

David Ritchey
No review yet.
To see a full review of this show, read David's posts at Talkin' Broadway

Andrea Simakis
No review yet.
To see a full review of this show, read Andrea Simakis' blog or visit Cleveland.com here.

Thursday, February 7, 2019

ONCE @ THE BECK CENTER FOR THE ARTS


Through February 24, 2019
(216) 521-2540

Bob Abelman

‘Once’ at the Beck Center entrances but does not transport.

To see a full review of this show, read Bob Abelman's blog here or go to www.clevelandjewishnews.com/columnists/bob_abelman/

Roy Berko
  
The Beck Center/Baldwin Wallace Music Theatre Program production of “Once,” is vibrant, and has talent overload.  This production rivals the Broadway staging and is much superior to the touring show which was part of the Key Bank Series.  It’s the kind of production that you might be tempted to go back and see again!  Go. You will enjoy!

To see a full review of this show, read Roy Berko's blog here.

Kerry Clawson

 There’s a deep sense of melancholy as well as a quiet joy emanating from the Beck Center for the Arts stage now with the musical “Once.”
Audience members are transported to a Dublin bar and its environs for this show, a partnership between Beck Center and the musical theater program at Baldwin Wallace University. With a cast of 16 directed by Victoria Bussert, it’s extraordinary how this talented young ensemble brings to life the world of an Irish and Czech community brought together by music.

To see a full review of this show, read Kerry Clawson's review here.

Mark Horning


You simply cannot be made to feel any better than seeing this extraordinary production with its wide range of musical numbers (soft love ballads to rousing dance numbers). The cast is spot on in their acting, singing, musician and dancing skills as they fill the stage with unabashed glee. Feeling under the weather? This is the tonic you need to cure your mid-winter blahs. 

To see a full review of this show, read Mark Horning's Review here.

Laura Kennelly

Once is a deeply spiritual work though that might not be obvious from its completely secular environment (a Dublin street, a bar, a vacuum repair shop, a hillside). We see love, charity and hope manifested in this tender story that never descends to sentimentality (or religiosity for that matter).

To see a full review of this show, read Laura's posts at Cool Cleveland.

SHERWOOD @ CLEVELAND PLAY HOUSE



Through February 24, 2019
(216) 241-6000


Bob Abelman

CPH’s swashbuckling ‘Sherwood’ parodies as it parries. 

To see a full review of this show, read Bob Abelman's blog here or go to  www.clevelandjewishnews.com/columnists/bob_abelman/

Roy Berko

“Sherwood” is for those who love to laugh at the ridiculous and see a well-written farce performed at the highest level.  The staging, the acting, the technical aspects are superb.  Go…laugh…escape from the ridiculousness of what’s going on in this country and the world, and have a good time!!!

To see a full review of this show, read Roy Berko's blog here.

Mark Horning


Sometimes theater simply needs to supply us with a break from the seriousness of life. Sherwood certainly fills the bill for that. Just like the classic swashbuckling movies of the 30s this show is a great escape from the humdrum. Come share a laugh or two.

To see a full review of this show, read Mark Horning's Review here. 

Laura Kennelly


Ken Ludwig’s Sherwood: The Adventures of Robin Hood, now at the Cleveland Play House’s Allen Theatre, sets a snappy pace. As seen in previous CPH Ludwig comedies (such as Baskerville, A Comedy of Tenors and The Game’s Afoot), farce rules in this capsule sketch of the triumph of Robin Hood and his Merry Band. It’s directed by Adam Immerwahr.  While nothing is safe from Ludwig’s gentle mockery, it’s all in good fun. Arrows fly (see if you can figure out how they do that without killing each other), towers are scaled, bad guys are trounced, and new love comes for Robin (yes, it’s Maid Marion, but it was a surprise for Ludwig’s Robin).

To see a full review of this show, read Laura's posts at Cool Cleveland.

THE IMPACT OF SHUFFLE ALONG @ KARAMU



Through February 9, 2019
(216) 795-7070

Roy Berko


The Impact of Shuffle Along” brings two unique organizations together, each with different demographics to heighten the CLE community’s awareness of an important musical, “telling a story of then and today.”

To see a full review of this show, read Roy Berko's blog here.

Mark Horning


Sometimes theater goes beyond its scope by offering not only entertainment but education as well. This is the case with the Karamu/Musical Theater Project production of The Impact of Shuffle Along. It is an evening of just plain feel good music, vocals, poetry, dance and story telling that will delight everyone who is fortunate to see this show.

To see a full review of this show, read Mark Horning's Review here.

Saturday, February 2, 2019

FREAKY FRIDAY @ LAKELAND CIVIC THEATRE


Lakeland Community College, Kirtland
February 1, 2, 8, 9, 15 & 16,, 2019 @ 7:30 PM and 

February 3, 10 and 17 @ 2 PM
440-525-7134
or www.lakelandcc.edu/academic/arts/theatre/index.asp

Bob Abelman


Lakeland Civic Theatre finds the fortitude in ‘Freaky Friday.’

To see a full review of this show, read Bob Abelman's blog here or go to www.clevelandjewishnews.com/columnists/bob_abelman/

Roy Berko

“Freaky Friday” is a farce which should delight an audience.  As is, except for the audience member on opening night who thought he was at a football game, and kept loudly cheering “way to go” and “good job” after each song and scene, the production should disappoint many.  Too bad!

To see a full review of this show, read Roy Berko's blog here.

Monday, January 28, 2019

MISS SAIGON @ PLAYHOUSE SQUARE


Through February 17, 2019
(216) 241-6000

Roy Berko

“Miss Saigon” is a powerful piece of musical theater, with a vital story and soaring music.  It tells a tale of historical significance, not sugarcoating the conflict, the effect of the presence of American GI’s on the Vietnamese population, and the human chaos that was left behind.   The impressive touring production was hampered by an overly loud sound system which had the orchestra drowning out the singers and direction, which resulted in overblown chaos in almost every scene. 

To see a full review of this show, read Roy Berko's blog here.

Kerry Clawson

Everything about this production is magnificently larger than life, from its dramatic love story to its massive score, gorgeous sets, bold staging and over-the-top sleaziness of the Engineer character.
 
To see a full review of this show, read Kerry Clawson's review here.

Howard Gollop

With slightly less scenic gimmickry and a bit more definition in musicality and dramatics, the revival production comes across much more emotionally satisfying and engaging. Yes, Broadway has grown smarter technologically as well as theatrically since the days of the Broadway dinosaur.

Laura Kennelly


Miss Saigon, that tale of war and woe, is back in Cleveland after all these years. The KeyBank Broadway Series musical, directed by Laurence Connor, offers a slightly reworked version of the first national tour that played here in 1992.  Although the show lacks a hummable score and relies too heavily on sung dialogue, it does succeed in adding a human face to the horror that was the Vietnam War. Its focus is on the fall of Saigon in 1975 when the Viet Cong took the city and the exodus of South Vietnamese troops and the U.S. military turned into panic-fueled chaos.

To see a full review of this show, read Laura's posts at Cool Cleveland.

Andrea Simakis

What I'll remember of the re-imagined "Miss Saigon" is Kim, almost spectral in white, riding the shoulders of a crowd trig to breach the gates of the American Embassy, her arms reaching out, and finding nothing.

To see a full review of this show, read Andrea Simakis' blog or visit Cleveland.com here.

Thursday, January 24, 2019

A RAISIN IN THE SUN @ ENSEMBLE THEATRE



Through February 17, 2019
 (216) 321-2930

Bob Abelman

Ensemble’s ‘A Raisin in the Sun’ is a week away from perfection.

To see a full review of this show, read Bob Abelman's blog here  or go to www.clevelandjewishnews.com/columnists/bob_abelman/

Mark Horning


As controversy charges the emotions of our nation in regards to who “deserves” to live “where” this work is a stern reminder of the basic freedoms enjoyed by us all. This is classic theater at its very best and just as hard hitting today as it was 60 years ago. Fill the seats for this one!

To see a full review of this show, read Mark Horning's Review here. 

Roy Berko

“A Raisin in the Sun” is a play about the need to keep fighting to make this a more just and free world.  This is a play which is meant to counter those who believe that disdain for those who are different is what would “make America great again.”  Ensemble does the script proud.  It is a production very worth seeing!

To see a full review of this show, read Roy Berko's blog here.

REVOLT. SHE SAID. REVOLT AGAIN. @ DOBAMA THEATRE


Through February 17, 2019
(216) 932-3396










Bob Abelman

Dobama’s anarchicRevolt’ a reminder that theater can and should shock.

To see a full review of this show, read Bob Abelman's blog here or go to: 
www.clevelandjewishnews.com/columnists/bob_abelman/

Roy Berko

Maybe the clue to gaining some concept of ““Revolt. She Said. Revolt Again,” is to look at the hundreds of shoes that totally surround the three-sided thrust Dobama stage, and realize that they are all different styles, sizes and colors, and accept that they, like the words of the script, are a clue to the chaos of our era, and though some may fit some, they will not fit all, and though some may serve one purpose, they each may fit another.  As such, the play, or any one pair of shoes, each is not for everyone!

To see a full review of this show, read Roy Berko's blog here.

Mark Horning


Disturbing! Visual! Loud! This play fully captures all of the unleashed pent-up fury of being a woman in the 21st century. Should men attend? Hell yes! Should couples attend? Hell yes! Bring the kids? Hell no! Just be warned that you are in for a jarring experience much akin to your first exposure to Caryl Churchill’s Cloud 9 (1979) and Eve Ensler’s The Vagina Monologues (1996). It is the type of theater that can bring empires down. 

To see a full review of this show, read Mark Horning's Review here. 

Andrea Simakis

But, my sisters, there is a fine line between a play that is naughty rude, and even anarchic--all traits I admire--and one that is often annoying.  That explains why I left the show not pumping my fist, electrified by the challenging, transgressive theater I'd just seen, but deflated and confused.

To see a full review of this show, read Andrea Simakis' blog or visit Cleveland.com here.

Friday, January 18, 2019

AN ILIAD @ CLEVELAND PLAY HOUSE



Through February 10, 2018
(216) 241-6000

Bob Abelman

‘An Iliad’ at Cleveland Play House takes us on a theatrical odyssey. 

To see a full review of this show, read Bob Abelman's blog here or go to www.clevelandjewishnews.com/columnists/bob_abelman/

Roy Berko

In a virtuoso performance, Tarah Flanagan, using language that ranges from contemporary realism to epic poetry, and inhabiting over 50 characters, challenges us to realize the role of rage and think, “How do you know you’ve won?”  As the modern day conflicts in Vietnam, Syria and Afghanistan illustrate, “How do you know?”  This is an absolute “must see” production for anyone who desires to experience a theater production at its finest and is willing to probe what makes us human.

To see a full review of this show, read Roy Berko's blog here.



 
Kerry Clawson

 In “An Iliad,” the tale of war that actress Tarah Flanagan recounts, is an age-old song of conflict, rage and destruction. But this single actress on a nearly bare stage makes the story feel contemporary as she addresses the audience directly as the Poet.

To see a full review of this show, read Kerry Clawson's review here.

Mark Horning


Take an epic poem, translate it into modern vernacular, relate it to situations that have been going on since time immemorial, add dashes of humor, the unworldly sounds of a cello, the sheer theatrical power of one tremendous actress and you have indeed a modern epic that will in itself go down through the ages. 

To see a full review of this show, read Mark Horning's Review here.

Laura Kennelly

How about a war story? Stomping across the bare floor of the Outcalt Theatre, the seemingly indefatigable Tarah Flanagan as The Poet calls upon the muses to sustain and inspire her as she recounts An Iliad. Her version, crafted by Lisa Peterson and Denis O’Hare, is based on the Robert Fagles translation of Homer’s classic.

See a full review at artstillmatters.com or read Laura's posts at Cool Cleveland.

Andrea Simakis

"An Iliad" is spellbinding, a rollicking adaptation filled with shrewd modern day references and burning with wit, intelligence and empathy, flawlessly executved by Tarah Flanagan and Eva Rose Scholz-Carlson.

To see a full review of this show, read Andrea Simakis' blog or visit Cleveland.com here.

Wednesday, January 16, 2019

RODGERS + HAMMERSTEIN'S CINDERELLA @ Connor Palace (Huntington Featured Performance)


January 15-20, 2019
216-241-6000 
or www.playhousesquare.org
Bob Abelman

You’re welcome.  If you choose to turn off the news, put down your cell phone, forget Facebook and head downtown to Playhouse Square to see the touring production of “Rodgers + Hammerstein’s Cinderella,” you will thank me for recommending these two and a half hours of unabashedly romantic, unadulterated, uninterrupted escapism. 

To see a full review of this show, read Bob Abelman's blog here or go to www.clevelandjewishnews.com/columnists/bob_abelman/

Roy Berko

The touring production of ROGERS AND HAMMERSTEIN’S CINDERELLA is well conceived and performed.  It is charming and delightful to the eye and ear.  It’s the wonderful experience that will leave audiences, young and old, glad they went to the theater and wishing for return trips. 
 
To see a full review of this show, read Roy Berko's blog here.

Howard Gollop

And so, the book goes off in more directions and plot distractions than a Victor Hugo novel. This becomes even more jarring, because few, if any, of these topical–relevance distractions are supported by the magnificent original Rodgers & Hammerstein score.

Fortunately, the songs are good enough and self-contained enough so that, no matter how far the book casts the fairytale astray, the music can take the show back over, if only briefly. All it takes is the wave of a conductor’s magic wand.


Mark Horning


Sometimes even a chestnut like Cinderella can surprise and delight. In this case it is the cast that brings out the magic carried solidly on the shoulders of youthful enthusiasm. Bring the entire clan for an astounding mid-winter break of happiness. It will have you believe that wishes can come true.

To see a full review of this show, read Mark Horning's Review here.

Friday, December 28, 2018

SPAMILTON: AN AMERICAN PARODY (National Tour) @ Hanna Theatre



December 24, 2018-January 6, 2019
216-241-6000 or www.playhousesquare.org

Roy Berko

Spamilton: An American Parody” can be a fun evening of theater if you don’t set the bar of pleasure at the “I have to understand everything that is sung.” Just grab what you can and enjoy the cleverness of the writer, the talent of the cast, and appreciate the homage being paid to Lynn-Manuel Miranda, who has created a musical masterpiece by the name of “Hamilton,” changing the American theater forever.      
     
To see a full review of this show, read Roy Berko's blog here.

Howard Gollop

Relax.  "Spamilton" is not some sophomoric cash-in on the unbridled "Hamilton" craze, trying to stretch a few middling jokes into a two-hour had one  This is the work of Gerrard Allessandrini, Broadway's foremost lampoonist who's best known for his constantly updated cabaret revue, "Forebidden Broadway."

Mark Horning


Will you be able to catch each and every small nuance of reference sprinkled throughout the show? Probably not and that is the fun of the show. It is like reading a book by fanning the pages. It will most probably be the fastest 63 minutes that you have ever experienced in the theater.

To see a full review of this show, read Mark Horning's Review here.
 
Laura Kennelly

Say what you will about Hamilton, Hamilton,/ but ya gotta see it before Spamilton, Spamilton,/ or you’ll be:/ lost. /So study what you can/ (YouTube is your best friend)/ then you can laugh a little/or a lot and say:/ “I gave it my best shot.”

As with Hamilton, the Broadway hit it’s based on, Spamilton ricochets an abundance of wit and words right at the audience. It seemed impossible to hear every nonstop word over the laughter from the previous riposte, especially (and paradoxically) since the sound was loud where I sat. But even though it was impossible to catch every allusion, the ones that were clear poked good-natured fun at musicals and the theater world in general. It helps to be a Broadway fan (hand raised here) and it helps (see above) to review Hamilton: The Musical.

To see a full review of this show, read Laura's posts at Cool Cleveland.


Sunday, December 23, 2018

Cleveland Critics Circle 2018 Theater Awards



The Cleveland Critics Circle each year honors local theaters, performances, writers, performers and technicians of plays staged by Cleveland area professional theaters during the January 1-December 31 year.

Award Committee Voters: Bob Abelman, Roy Berko, Kerry Clawson, Howard Gollop, Mark Horning, Christine Howey, Laura Kennely and Andrea Simakis.  Participation in these awards does not preclude individual critics from preparing their own recognitions.

Those recognized for Superior Achievement are listed alphabetically, not by order of achievement.

Best Musical Production:  Passing Strange, Karamu
Superior Achievement:
            Jane Eyre, Cleveland Music Theatre
            Memphis, Cain Park
            Next to Normal, Porthouse

Best Non-Musical Production: The Royale, Cleveland Play House
Superior Achievement:
            Boogieban, None Too Fragile
            Freak Storm, None Too Fragile
            Grounded, Dobama
            Pride and Prejudice, Great Lakes Theater
            Sunset Baby, Dobama
            Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf?, Beck Center
           
Best Actor Musical:  Douglas F. Bailey, Memphis, Cain Park
Superior Achievement:
            Eric Fancher, Merrily We Roll Along, Lakeland Civic Theatre
            Justin C. Woody, Passing Strange, Karamu
            Matt Bogart, Jane Eyre, Cleveland Music Theatre
            Thom Christopher Warren, Next to Normal, Porthouse
           
Best Actor Non-Musical: (tie) David Peacock and Travis Teffner, Boogieban, None Too Fragile   
Superior Achievement:
            Ananias J Dixon, Sunset Baby, Dobama
            Lynn Robert Berg, Macbeth, Great Lakes Theater
            Michel Mauldin, Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf?, Beck Center
            Prophet D. Seay, The Adventures of a Black Girl in Search of God, Karamu
            Ryan Zarecki, Scapin, Ohio Shakespeare Festival       
           
Best Actress Musical:  Amy Fritsche, Next to Normal, Porthouse
Superior Achievement:
            Kelvete Beacham, Caroline or Change, Mercury Theatre Company
            Nicole Sumlin, Memphis, Cain Park
            Trinidad Snider, A Little Night Music, Lakeland Civic Theatre

Best Actress Non-Musical:  Anjanette Hall, Grounded, Dobama
            Superior Achievement:
            Catherine Albers, John, Dobama
            Derdriu Ring, Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf?, Beck Center
            Jeanine Gaskin, In The Blood, Convergence Continuum
            Mary Francis Miller, Sunset Baby, Dobama
            Tess Burgler, Shakespeare in Love, Ohio Shakespeare Festival
            Tracee Patterson, Appropriate, Dobama
                       
Rising Stars
            Male
            Justin C. Woody, Passing Strange, Karamu
            Warren Egypt Franklin, Mamma Mia, Great Lakes Theater

            Female
            Brooke Turner, Bloomsday, None Too Fragile
            Christina Perrault, Beehive, Great Lakes Theater
            Emma McLelland, Jane Eyre, Cleveland Music Theatre         
            Kailey Boyle, Mamma Mia!, Great Lakes Theater

Best Director Musical: Jim Weaver, Next to Normal, Porthouse
Superior Achievement:
            Miles Sternfeld, Jane Eyre, Cleveland Music Theatre
            Nathan A. Lilly, Passing Strange, Karamu
            Patrick Ciamacco, Avenue Q, Blank Canvas Theatre
            Patrick Ciamacco, We Will Rock You, Blank Canvas Theatre

Best Director Non-Musical: Robert Barry Fleming, The Royale, Cleveland Play           House
Superior Achievement:
            Alice Reagan, Grounded, Dobama
            Donald Carrier, Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf?, Beck Center
            Greg Cesear, Plath and Orion, Cesear’s Forum
            Sean Derry, Boogieban, None Too Fragile
            Terry Burgler, Scapin, Ohio Shakespeare Festival
           
Best Choreographer: Martin C├ęspedes, Jane Eyre, Cleveland Music Theatre
Superior Achievement:
            Mary Ann Black, Anything Goes, Porthouse
            Jaclyn Miller, Mamma Mia!, Great Lakes Theater
            John E. Crawford-Spinelli, Oklahoma!, Porthouse

Best Musical Direction:  Jennifer Korecki, Oklahoma!, Porthouse
Superior Achievement:
Jonathan Swoboda, Next to Normal, Porthouse
Jordan Cooper, Memphis, Cain Park
Matt Dolan, Avenue Q, Blank Canvas

Best Scenic Design:  Cameron Michalak, John, Dobama and The Effect, Dobama
Superior Achievement:
            Aaron Benson, Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf?, Beck Center
            Inda Blatch-Geib, Sassy Mamas, Karamu
            Robert Mark Morgan, Sweat, Cleveland Play House
            Russell Mentheny, Macbeth, Great Lakes Theater
           
Best Lighting Design: Michael Boll, The Invisible Hand, Cleveland Play House
Superior Achievement:
            Alan C. Edwards, The Royale, Cleveland Play House
            Benjamin Gantose, Jane Eyre, Cleveland Music Theatre
            Marcus Dana, Freak Storm, None Too Fragile
            Rich Martin, Macbeth, Great Lakes Theater

Best Projection Design:  T. Paul Lowry, Ella Enchanted, Dobama
Superior Achievement:
            Kasumi, Hair, Beck Center
            T. Paul Lowry, Jane Eyre, Cleveland Music Theatre
T. Paul Lowry, Sunset Baby, Dobama
            T. Paul Lowry, The Effect, Dobama         

Best Costume Design:   Martha Hally, Pride and Prejudice, Great Lakes Theatre
Superior Achievement:
Inda Blatch-Geib, Sassy Mamas, Karamu
Marty LaConte, Romeo and Juliet, Ohio Shakespeare Festival
Tracy Christensen, Mamma Mia!, Great Lakes Theater

Best Sound Design:  Daniel Perelstein, The Invisible Hand, Cleveland Play House
Superior Achievement:
            Brian Kenneth Armour, Boogieban, None Too Fragile
            Jane Shaw, The Royale, Cleveland Play House
           
Best Touring Production:  Hamilton, Playhouse Square

Best New Play by a Local Playwright:  The Casual Tree Ward, Convergence-Continuum, Robert Hawkes

Best Ensemble in a Musical:  Oklahoma!, Porthouse
Superior Achievement:
            Mamma Mia!, Great Lakes Theater
            Avenue Q, Blank Canvas

Best World Premiere in the Cleveland area:  Boogieban, None Too Fragile
           
Special Mention:

Cleveland Public Theatre for taking the lead, in a major way, in providing theater arts education for under-served communities through initiatives such as Brick City Theatre, Cleveland Act Now, Y Haven Theatre Project, the Student Theatre Enrichment Program, Teatro P├║blico de Cleveland and Masrah Cleveland Al-Arabi.

Dougfred Miller, Great Lakes Theater

Martin Friedman, 50th production at Lakeland

Roe Green, philanthropic contributions to Cleveland area theater organizations (Maltz Performing Arts Center, Kent State University, Cleveland Play House, Case Western Reserve, Jewish Community Center)

How to End Poverty in 90 Minutes, Cleveland Public Theatre, for bringing community awareness to poverty in Cleveland

Tony Silas for his efforts in leading the rebirth of Karamu as a viable theater program

Porthouse on its 50th anniversary and Terri Kent on her 18th season as its Artistic Director

Dorothy Silver’s five-minute monologue on why her character went crazy, in John at Dobama

Krumping Consultants, Javion Allen, Keith T. Benford and Fitness/Boxing Consultant KJ Johnson for the stylized boxing sequences in The Royale, Cleveland Play House

New World Performance Lab for a galvanizing and inventive production of a bilingual adaptation of Don Quijote by Argentine playwright Patricia Suarez