Saturday, April 12, 2014

A KILLING GAME @ Cleveland Public Theatre

April 10-26, 2014 216-631-2727 or go to www.cptonline.org

Bob Abelman

"A Killing Game" is communal Cranium -- a living board game played by a handful of hesitant audience members, a smattering of extraverts picking up the slack, some inner-children set free and running wild and – during my evening of engagement – a few uninhibited inebriants keeping things interesting.  For immersive theater like this, random acts of art are as likely to rise as moments of inanity.  It is good fun for those willing to have it.

To see a full review of this show, read Bob Abelman's CJN article here.

Howard Gollop
No review yet.

Mark Horning
The best part about this show is the fact that you, the audience, are able to actively participate in all the fun.   You will find yourself caught up in the maelstrom of action that carries you along for a delightful evening of solid entertainment.  See this show and more importantly, be a part of the show!        
To see a full review of this show, read Mark Horning's blog.

Christine Howey
No review yet.

To see a full review of this show, read Christine Howey's blog Rave and Pan
To see a full review of this show, read Christine Howey's review at  Cleveland Scene

Andrea Simakis
No review yet.

To see a full review of this show, read Andrea Simakis' blog or visit Cleveland.com here.

Saturday, April 5, 2014

AS YOU LIKE IT @ Great Lakes Theatre

April 4-19, 2014
216-664-6064 or www.greatlakestheater.org

Bob Abelman

It is testimony to the quality of Shakespeare’s writing that, 415 years after its premiere, “As You Like It” still holds up as a delightful romantic comedy and beguiling piece of social commentary.

And it is testimony to the integrity of Great Lakes Theater that, 52 years after its inception, it is still conjuring up new, effective and entertaining ways to re-imagine Shakespeare’s work.


To see a full review of this show, read Bob Abelman's CJN article here.

Roy Berko 

Great Lakes Theater’s “As You Like It,” though it doesn’t fully develop director Edward Morgan’s philosophical objectives, is delightful.  The many students who will attend should go away with a very positive concept of the Shakespearean comedy at its best.

To see a full review of this show, read Roy Berko's blog here.

Mark Horning

What better way to end another exceptional season with Great Lakes Theater then the production of William Shakespeare’s “As You Like It”.  This is an excellent introduction for those novices out there who think Shakespeare too “high brow” or hard to understand as well as the veteran theater patrons looking for something wonderful.  This is a fast moving, comedic delight that brings Shakespeare to life.  Don’t miss this one.

To see a full review of this show, read Mark Horning's blog.

Christine Howey

Their production of As You Like It, directed with wit and snap by Edward Morgan, is a simply glorious romp that lands in C-town at the perfect moment. You needn’t wait until May 2nd for the world’s largest outdoor chandelier to light up down the street—this play will dazzle PlayhouseSquare for the next two weeks. And you’re a bigger fool than Touchstone if you don’t samples its many delights.

To see a full review of this show, read Christine Howey's blog Rave and Pan

GIDION'S KNOT @ none too fragile theater

April 4-17, 2014
none to fragile theater

Roy Berko
 

If it is the purpose of theatre to have a life-awakening experience and to get the audience so emotionally involved that they forget they are in a theatre, then none too fragile’s GIDION’S KNOT fully fulfills that goal!   This is theatre at its finest and is an absolute MUST see.  Please avail yourself of the wonder of this  fine theatrical offering!  Bravo!
 

To see a full review of this show, read Roy Berko's blog here.

Kerry Clawson
No review yet.


To see a full review of this show, read Kerry Clawson's review here.

Mark Horning
No review yet.

To see a full review of this show, read Mark Horning's blog.
 
Christine Howey

 In less than 80 minutes, Gidion’s Knot provides a snarl of feelings generated by the animal protectiveness of parents and the subversive yet unavoidable influence institutions have on our lives. In short, it leaves you plenty to talk about for the rest of the evening.

To see a full review of this show, read Christine Howey's blog Rave and Pan

Andrea Simakis
No review yet.


To see a full review of this show, read Andrea Simakis' blog or visit Cleveland.com here.

Thursday, April 3, 2014

FLASHDANCE THE MUSICAL @ The Palace Theatre

April 1-13, 2014
216-241-6000 or www.playhousesquare.org

Bob Abelman

It was announced on NPR’s “All Things Considered” last week that a remake of the 1941 classic film “Citizen Kane” is premiering in Toronto.  Starring in the movie is Keanu Reeves as Charles Foster Kane.  This story, of course, aired on April 1. 

Watching “Flashdance: The Musical,” currently on stage at PlayhouseSquare, is like April Fool’s Day all over again.  A musical based on a dated, music-video-inspired film about a female welder/exotic dancer who wants to be a ballerina?  Really?  A show that never actually played on Broadway being a part of the Keybank Broadway Series?   April Fools!  Right?

 “Flashdance: The Musical” is all glitz and no guts.   Its only saving grace is a hard-working cast and the fact that that Keanu Reeves is not among them.

To see a full review of this show, read Bob Abelman's CJN article here

Roy Berko


“Flashdance The Musical” is one of those musicals that delights audiences, while not being a well-written show.  It has strong music, great choreography and Corey Mach, local kid makeing good.  That ought be more than enough to please the Cleveland faithful.
To see a full review of this show, read Roy Berko's blog here.

Howard Gollop

It's been 30 years after Hollywood unveiled the rags-to-high-heels-and-rags saga about a would-be prima ballerina who's been molded out of the steel mills of Pittsburgh. By golly, that leg-warmer-clad heroine is still the "Solid-Gold" maniac to be reckoned with today. 

It turns out "Flashdance" is no flash in the pan.


Mark Horning
“Flashdance” is one of those shows that we wait the entire season to come around.  It is a superb evening of musical escapism that is the hallmark of great Broadway type shows even though it is not a true “Broadway Production”.  In spite of the fact that it is a bit farfetched and weak as far as story line, it is the superb cast that pulls off the exceptional magic.   I fear that tickets may be scarce for this production.  If you have not already ordered your tickets I suggest you do so without fail.
To see a full review of this show, read Mark Horning's blog.

Christine Howey
This is a production that seeks to pummel the audience into submission with deafening music, cornea-searing laser lights, 80s pop music and dance steps of every description. What is missing is any emotional clarity or honesty.

To see a full review of this show, read Christine Howey's review at  Cleveland Scene

Andrea Simakis

"Flashdance" is a classic yarn with a timeless theme. At its core, the piece is really all about following your dream, obstacles be damned. 
To see a full review of this show, read Andrea Simakis' blog or visit Cleveland.com here.

Art Thomas

It's a movie from the 1980's that has been enhanced and expanded to fit perfectly with the hip sensibilities of today's younger theatergoers. The cast are best in the first act's ensemble dance numbers, but the new songs lack variety to this older pair of ears.  

Click here to read the complete review at WestLife

Saturday, March 29, 2014

HANDLE WITH CARE @ Actors Summit

March 27-April 13, 2014
For tickets:  330-374-7568 or go to www.actorssummit.org

Bob Abelman

Though well delivered, “Handle With Care” comes COD by asking its audience to forgive the playwright’s creative trespasses and accept fine storytelling in lieu of a fine story. 

To see a full review of this show, read Bob Abelman's CJN review here.


Mark Horning
Although the story line is very predictable, it is the energy and skill of the actors that carries the day in this delightful morsel of escapism.  Bring a friend or a loved one to share this show with.  It is an unpretentious package that you will enjoy unwrapping.  
To see a full review of this show, read Mark Horning's blog.


Kerry Clawson
HANDLE WITH CARE is a play on the rise, recently ending its New York premiere Off-Broadway and soon to be published by Dramatists Play Service. Yet the script is peppered with unnatural-sounding dialogue and some emotional connections are lacking between characters in a current production at Actors’ Summit in Akron.


To see a full review of this show, read Kerry Clawson's review here.


CLYBOURNE PARK @ Cleveland Play House

Runs through April 13, 2014
For tickets call 216-241-6000 or go to http://www.clevelandplayhouse.com 


 Bob Abelman


Despite some ungainly and inconsistent acting choices, CPH's “Clybourne Park” is wonderfully staged and a pleasure to watch.  With its Pulitzer Prize pedigree, it is also a pleasure to listen to.  And think about afterward. 

To see a full review of this show, read Bob Abelman's CJN article here.

Roy Berko
 
Pulitzer Prize winning ‘CLYBOURNE PARK’ is an emotionally moving and thought-provoking script that effectively highlights the still present distrust between members of different races.  It does that while inserting enough natural humor to keep the audience engaged.  It gets an acceptable, but not spellbinding production at CPH.  It’s a significant play worth seeing.
 
To see a full review of this show, read Roy Berko's blog here.

Kerry Clawson
No review yet.
To see a full review of this show, read Kerry Clawson's review here.

Howard Gollop

Directed by Mark Cuddy, the extremely intelligent, perfect-pitch Play House cast members embrace the deep, profound drama lurking behind every deceptively benign verbal exchange. 

Oddly, enough, this drama of ideas becomes more fluid than static.

Of course it didn't hurt to have the enveloping house set and easily convincing period costumes by designer G.W. Mercier.


Mark Horning


Clybourne Park is the entire theater package.  There is a strong double story line that runs parallel to each other, great comedic moments (especially with the facial exchanges between cast members), high drama and a pertinent story line that we can all learn from  The pacing starts out slow in each segment in order to build to an exciting climax by the end of each act.  This is a great cast that gives its all to the performance.  See this show.

To see a full review of this show, read Mark Horning's blog.


Christine Howey
The script is fiendishly clever in many ways, as its double-cast players make the leap from 1959 in the first act to 2009 after the intermission. But there is a major speed bump in the writing that makes the play less impactful than it could be. And while the performances by the CPH players are fine in most respects, a couple missteps interrupt the smooth meshing of these dramatic gears.

To see a full review of this show, read Christine Howey's review at  Cleveland Scene

Andrea Simakis

"Clybourne Park" is the sort of play you wish you could rewind after the final scene and watch again. Immediately. It's that complicated, thorny and disturbing. And let's not forget funny – the kind of funny that elicited nervous laughter and shocked guffaws of the "did she just say that?" variety on opening night at the Allen Theatre.

To see a full review of this show, read Andrea Simakis' blog or visit Cleveland.com here.

Art Thomas


How can an issue charged with deeply serious emotions be presented with so much humor? That's what you'll see in "Clybourne Park", a deserving celebrated play that exposes the nerves when "that other" kind of person wants to move into your neighborhood. The Play House production, another "joint" one, shows the value of partnering with another theater. The cast, direction and physical production are all superb. 
 
Click here to read the complete review at WestLife

Thursday, March 27, 2014

[sic] @ Theater Ninjas

February 27-March 15, 2014
http://theaterninjas.com

Mark Horning
Theater Ninjas’ “[sic]” now playing at 78th Street Studios is a collection of comic vignettes put together in a loose story line that is sure to delight everyone.  It is sharply written as well as sharply performed by a very able cast.  Take the time to seek this one out (clue: go to 78th Street Studios at 1300 78th Street, Cleveland, Ohio and follow the signs to the second floor).  You will be richly rewarded for your effort.   
To see a full review of this show, read Mark Horning's blog.


Saturday, March 22, 2014

'night MOTHER @ Beck Center

March 21-May 4, 2014
For tickets call:  216-521-2540 or go on-line to http://www.beckcenter.org

Bob Abelman

This beautifully written, 90-minute, Pulitzer Prize-winning conversation between a mother and her suicidal daughter is not an easy or pleasant evening of theater.  But with Dorothy Silver and Laura Perrotta in the leads, it is a thoroughly mesmorizing one.

To see a full review of this show, read Bob Abelman's Cleveland Jewish News article here.

Roy Berko

Beck’s “’night Mother ”is one of the finest evenings of theatre one can experience.  The script, the acting, the directing are all of the highest quality. It is not an escapist experience, but is an opportunity to look at an on-going issue of our culture and gain an understanding of how the lack of fulfillment of our basic needs has an effect on life decisions.  It’s not for escapists, but for realists. This is an absolutely, must see for anyone who wants to participate in an all embracing theatrical experience. 

To see a full review of this show, read Roy Berko's blog here.

Howard Gollop
No review yet.

Mark Horning
For those looking for high drama and are not squeamish about a frank portrayal of suicide this will be a good show for you to see.  It is superbly acted, humorous at times and the high drama carries clear to the fade-out, but be forewarned…it is a shocker even when you know the ending.  After the show, head across the street to “The Sweet Spot” for some nerve soothing gelato.  You will need it.
To see a full review of this show, read Mark Horning's blog.


Christine Howey
Playwright Norman's script is a perfect GPS device for locating loneliness and depression, no "recalculating" required. And this production delivers the audience to that destination with harrowing assurance.

To see a full review of this show, read Christine Howey's review at  Cleveland Scene

Andrea Simakis

The play, by Marsha Norman, won the Pulitzer Prize for drama in 1983. It boasts a bang-up cast – the very fine actresses Dorothy Silver and Laura Perrotta. At its helm is Scott Plate, a smart director who brought heat and corrosive comedy to the Studio Theater last year with "The Little Dog Laughed."

All that goodwill, not to mention star power, is the only way to tackle what is arguably one of the gloomiest scripts in American theater. And no matter whose name is in the program, there's no getting around that.
To see a full review of thi
s show, read Andrea Simakis' blog or visit Cleveland.com here.

Art Thomas

As relevant today as it was more than thirty years ago, "'Night Mother" still packs a solid punch as a desperate adult daughter calmly explains her iminent suicide to her mother. Winner of a well-deserved Pulitzer Prize, "'Night Mother" is solidly acted by Laura Perrotta and Dorothy Silver.

Click here to read the complete review at WestLife

Thursday, March 20, 2014

Not By Bread Alone @ The Ohio Theatre of PlayhouseSquare

March 19, 2014

Roy Berko
No review yet.
To see a full review of this show, read Roy Berko's blog here.

Mark Horning
Na Lagàat Deaf-Blind Theater Company’s “Not By Bread Alone” will dig deep into your soul and stir emotions that you have not felt for quite some time.  As the smell of fresh baked bread caresses the air of the theater you will find yourself changing just like the bread; from a lump of pasty dough to a culinary golden brown delight that can bring love and wonder to everyone’s hearts. 
To see a full review of this show, read Mark Horning's blog.

Sunday, March 16, 2014

THE ELABORATE ENTRANCE OF CHAD DEITY @ Karamu

March 14-April 6, 2014
216-795-7077 or www.karamuhouse.org

Bob Abelman

Let’s get ready to stumble.  Failing to generate the rowdy audience reaction so essential to professional wrestling and plays about it, dead air and missed cues managed to pile-drive and pin this Karamu Theatre production of  "The Elaborate Entrance of Chad Diety." 

To see a full review of this show, read Bob Abelman's Cleveland Jewish News article here.

Mark Horning

“The Elaborate Entrance of Chad Deity” is just that…Elaborate.  A tremendous amount of effort has been put into this play to give you the “real wrestling experience”.  Even if you are not a fan of wrestling, see this for the exceptional performances and body slams.

To see a full review of this show, read Mark Horning's blog.

Christine Howey
This is a play that desperately wants to be a satire on American values, reflected through the faux posturing (and faux everything) of pro wrestling. But the production body slams itself in too many ways to be very effective.

To see a full review of this show, read Christine Howey's blog Rave and Pan


LOBSTER ALICE @ convergence-continuum


March 14-April 5, 2014

Bob Abelman

“Lobster Alice” is an amuse-bouche – a small taste of something delicious (the historical collaboration between painter Salvador Dali and the Walt Disney Studios in 1946) and complex (the disturbing, dreamlike quality of surrealism) that will not be made available in larger supply.

To see a full review of this show, read Bob Abelman's article in the Cleveland Jewish News here.

Roy Berko


 “Lobster Alice” is not a great play, but con-con gives it a surrealist production which should delight the theatre’s niche audience.  If you want an evening of the unexpected and irrational, this could be your thing.
 
To see a full review of this show, read Roy Berko's blog here.

Mark Horning
Tired of winter?  Can’t wait until you can put the three layers of clothing away?  Convergence-Contiuum’s “Lobster Alice” is just the ticket to brush the late winter blues aways.  Let Salvador Dali take you to a different and happier place (think bizarre) where you can forget about living in Cleveland for one evening.  Afterwards, find a nice bar in the Tremont or Ohio City area to discuss the play over a bottle of good wine and as Dali would suggest, “…put a little seduction into your life.”
To see a full review of this show, read Mark Horning's blog.

Christine Howey
You may remember Walt Disney as the avuncular fellow who brought you The Mickey Mouse Club and Lady and the Tramp, or as the morally wizened guy who helped the House Un-American Activities Committee do its evil work in the early 1950s. But either way, you will probably have a hard time imagining Uncle Walt being involved with the wacky and inspired creations of surrealist artist Salvador Dali. Yet they did join forces, back in the 1940s, and that odd but real partnership is the subject of the thoroughly entertaining and endearingly bizarre Lobster Alice by Kira Obolensky, now at convergence-continuum.
To see a full review of this show, read Christine Howey's review at  Cleveland Scene

Art Thomas

So much of what Con-Con presents is surreal, that this piece comes off as a mild, modern entry into theater of the absurd, set in the 1940's. The talented cast work hard but the presence of the eccentric Walt Disney is never more than background, while Salvador Dali is more outrageous than cutting edge. 

Click here to read the complete review at WestLife

Tuesday, March 11, 2014

TITUS A GRAND GORY ROCK MUSICAL @ Cleveland Public Theatre

March 7-March 22, 2014
For tickets call 216-631-2727 or go to www.cptonline.org 

Bob Abelman

When the dust settles, the epic journey that is Titus: A Grand and Gory Rock Musical” turns out to be an entertaining one.  So sit back and enjoy the folly you see before you in the guise of a bloody revenge story and classic tragedy.  After all, how many people in the last 400 years can actually claim to have had fun watching this play?  

To see a full review of this show, read Bob Abelman's Cleveland Jewish News article here.

Roy Berko


"TITUS A GRAND AND GORY ROCK-MUSICAL" is definitely a production that will not be appreciated by everyone.  It should satisfy the targeted CPT audience who will rock out with the music, appreciate the present political implications of the message, and give it standing ovations for its gutsy creativity.

To see a full review of this show, read Roy Berko's blog here.


Mark Horning

Although they give it a good try, this rock version of Shakespeare’s ends up too long, too loud and too hard to enjoy.  This is a work in serious need of a rewrite as well as ramping up the speed of the dialog delivery.  The gory parts are funny and the funny parts are not.  In short, this is a work that cannot decide what it wants to be when it grows up…a Shakespearean tragedy, a comedy or a rock show.   

To see a full review of this show, read Mark Horning's blog.

Christine Howey

This thumping bloodbath, conceived and directed with no-holds-barred muscularity by Craig J. George, is both cringe-inducing and funny. And unlike some rock-addled extravaganzas, the music by local talents Dennis Yurich and Alison Garrigan is always appropriate to the moment (sometimes raucous, sometimes mellow), and never itntrusive.

To see a full review of this show, read Christine Howey's review at  Cleveland Scene

Andrea Simakis

One of the problems with this play, the reason there have only been a handful of truly memorable "Tituses," is that it's "incredibly difficult to do the gore," says [Craig] George [the play’s director]. "But the other reason is, they can't figure out if it's funny or it's just a tragedy."

To see a full review of this show, read Andrea Simakis' blog or visit Cleveland.com here.

Saturday, March 8, 2014

MADE IN AMERICA @ Dobama

Dobama
March 7-April 6, 2014
216-932-3396 or dobama.org

Bob Abelman

"Made in America" is a poor man’s “Glengarry Glen Ross” – another dark comedy about salesmen, salesmanship, and the personal and professional cost of doing business. It lacks the depth, drive, and drama of David Mamet’s Pulitzer Prize and Tony Award-winning play and, while an interesting and cleverly constructed two-hander, it is not an engaging or satisfying one.

To see a full review of this show, read Bob Abelman's article in the Cleveland Jewish News here.

Roy Berko


Dobama should be commended for going out on a limb by selecting a new play.  Unfortunately, MADE IN AMERICA is not a polished script and needed to be more completely tested to determine if it was audience ready.  Attendees will be rewarded by being the first to see the script in production, but should be aware that they are seeing a piece of theatrical writing in progress, which is given a competent production.

To see a full review of this show, read Roy Berko's blog here.

Mark Horning

“Made In America” offers an intense evening of drama that slowly builds to a crescendo.  It magnifies the seamier side of capitalism as well as the human condition.  After the well played set up with the first act, the second act surprises you with a series of plot twists that will delight and satisfy.


To see a full review of this show, read Mark Horning's blog.

Christine Howey

Even with one glitch and one major problem, there is much to admire and enjoy in Made in America. And, you know, it’s about a salesperson! So cool.

To see a full review of this show, read Christine Howey's blog Rave and Pan



Tuesday, March 4, 2014

JOSEPH AND THE AMAZING TECHNICOLOR DREAMCOAT

Playhouse Square--Palace
March 5-16, 2014
216-241-6000 or www.playhousesquare.org

Bob Abelman

Energized, idol-ized, eager-to-please  ‘Joseph’ is living the dream. 

To see a full review of this show, read Bob Abelman's article here.


Roy Berko


JOSEPH is one of my favorite escapist musical theatre scripts.  I love the music, the creativity of taking a Bible story and making it into a pleasant family experience without getting preachy.  The version now on stage at the Palace was not one of my favorite stagings of the show.  Audiences will generally like it, but it could have been “One More Angel in Heaven,” at least in show business firmament, but it wasn’t.
To see a full review of this show, read Roy Berko's blog here.


Howard Gollop

As if Andrew Lloyd Webber's biblical saga of a boy and his garment isn't light and frothy enough -- infused with feel-good pop-rock anthems -- director/choreographer Andy Blankenbuehler gets things so hopping and tapping, it could give the "Brady Bunch Variety Hour" a run for its money.

Howard Gollop's whole reviews are only available to subscribers of the Chronicle-Telegram.

Mark Horning

While not a perfect opening night performance, you can still prepare yourself to be dazzled by the lights, sound, music, dancing, singing and music of this performance of “JOSEPH and the Amazing Technicolor Dreamcoat” in the Palace Theatre at PlayhouseSquare.  It is two hours of fun entertainment that will help you put the winter blues on hold for awhile.


To see a full review of this show, read Mark Horning's blog.


Christine Howey

If you love “American Idol” and bare male chests, then this current packaging of the reliable theatrical warhorse Joseph and the Amazing Technicolor Dreamcoat will no doubt amaze and delight you. After all, it stars two Idol alums, the newlywed couple Diana DeGarmo and Ace Young, the latter of whom parades around in the buff from his waist up, Putin-style, when he’s not wearing the aforementioned robe.

To see a full review of this show, read Christine Howey's blog Rave and Pan


Art Thomas

Lovers of "Joseph/Dreamcoat" should be excited by the quirks of this production. New orchestrations which are pleasant and surprising are combined with a dance heavy first act that moves like a spirited freight train. A new finale maximizes the pop voices of Diana DeGarmo and Ace Young, who sound oddly out of place earlier in the musical theater setting. Projections everywhere give depth to the production.  
 

Click here to read the complete review at WestLife

Monday, February 24, 2014

BUS STOP @ Actors' Summit

ACTORS' SUMMIT
FEBRUARY 20-MARCH 19, 2014
330-374-7568 or go to www.actorssummit.org



Bob Abelman
 
Actors’ Summit captures all the Inge-enuity of "Bus Stop" -- the humor, the tenderness, the lonliness that drives this play.

To see a full review of this show, read Bob Abelman's Cleveland Jewish News article here.
 

Kerry Clawson

William Inge’s BUS STOP is a comedy but it’s a quiet one, full of characters who yearn for personal connections in varying ways. At Actors’ Summit, the play is sensitively, beautifully directed by Ric Goodwin, a recently retired professor from Ashland University who has previously acted at Actors’ Summit. ... BUS STOP is a treat with all its finely nuanced characterizations, and theater lovers won’t want to miss this ride.

To see a full review of this show, read Kerry Clawson's review here.


Tom Fulton 

BUS STOP is a lovely production, expertly directed and acted by a fine ensemble.  It is classic American theater.

To read the full review go tohttp://www.clevescene.com/cleveland/waiting-for-the-bus-top-notch-acting-divines-fate-at-beautiful-actors-summit/Content?oid=3811887 http://www.clevescene.com/cleveland/waiting-for-the-bus-top-notch-acting-divines-fate-at-beautiful-actors-summit/Content?oid=3811887


Saturday, February 22, 2014

DEATHTRAP @ Great Lakes Theatre

Great Lakes Theater  
February 21-March 16, 2014
216-664-6064 or www.greatlakestheater.org

Bob Abelman
 

“Pain!!!!” screeches Helga, the Scandinavian psychic in Ira Levin’s “Deathtrap,” as she enters the stage and senses murder most foul.  But pleasure is the only emotion emanating from the audience during this wonderful Great Lakes Theater production of Broadway’s longest running play-within-a-play-within-a-comedy thriller.

 To see a full review of this show, read Bob Abelman's Cleveland Jewish News article here.

Roy Berko
 

“DEATHTRAP” is a fun mystery filled with plausible twists and turns that incites the curiosity of the audience in their attempt to figure out what’s going to happen next. The GLT’s production, under the direction of Charles Fee, brings out the best in the script and is a must-see for anyone interested in a delightful escapist theater experience.

To see a full review of this show, read Roy Berko's blog here.

Howard Gollop

Great Lakes production shines best visually with the fetching, rich country house set by designer Russel Metheny. It's riddled with character, theatricality and all sorts of deliciously portentous details.  Great Lake's Theater's energetic artistic director Charles Fee certainly delivers the goods, shock wise -- although neither he nor the hard-working cast manage  elevate Levin's utilitarian dialogue and sketchy characterizations.  But that doesn't seem to matter to most of the shrieking audience members.  

Mr Gollop's full review is only available to subscribers of the CHRONILE-TELEGRAM 

Mark Horning 

This show has more twists and turns than a horseshoe shaped corkscrew.  Whether or not you have seen this work in any form, the Great Lakes Theater production of “Deathtrap” will still thrill you with its superb acting and finely tuned dramatic surprises.  If you have not been shocked lately (in a good way), a great experience awaits you at the Hanna Theatre.    
   
 To see a full review of this show, read Mark Horning's blog.

Andrea Simakis
 

Levin didn't build a perfect, foolproof mousetrap. But it is an insanely entertaining one, and Charles Fee and company gleefully execute Levin's crafty script. The games begin with a "Telltale Heart" ker-thump, ker-thump, ker-thump from sound designer Richard B. Ingraham, an ominous soundtrack that opens the show.
 
To see a full review of this show, read Andrea Simakis' blog or visit Cleveland.com here.

Art Thomas 

Even forty years after its premiere, "Deathtrap" delivers almost equal parts thrills and laughs. The brilliantly crafted script by Ira Levin is secure in Charlie Fee's ensemble cast. Comedic digs at producers and critics sit comfortably with sexual tension and scarey movie music. A genuine hoot and a holler. 

Click here to read the complete review at WestLife